Fashion Editorial: Testing & Experimentation

Second part of my photo shoot “Fuchsine”

Inside the world of ‘Fast Fashion’, a term coined by retailers to encapsulate how trends can quickly move from the catwalk to the consumer’s hands, the manufacturing is quick and cheap and consumers can easily take advantage of affordable collections in shops like H&M and Zara, and get involved in current fashion crazes.

In this way consumers, don’t get as much involved with fashion sustainability and therefore it does not constitute part of their social identity, rather the opposite. There is a greater need to discuss sustainable consumption so more people can begin to identify with it.  We as consumers should adopt new fashion habits and broaden our knowledge regarding how our clothes are made and where they came from.

The harvest methods, the cultivation, the distribution, and the manufacturing are big processes which involve several people and are factors which should be thoroughly followed by international standards controls.

The production of fibres and textiles is increasing, with cotton and polyester dominating the fashion market with large amounts of water and energy used in the production process.

170519000000020006.jpg

The title of the photo shoot I previously published, derives from the  synthetic magenta dye, fuchsine.

This dye does not occur in the nature and is used mainly as a textile dye . It has a green appearance but it becomes magenta after dissolved in water.

This dye created controversy as it showed that there is a high risk of contracting bladder cancer among the men who worked in the manufacturing. Because our theme is regarding wastewater pollution by textile fabrics, the process of dying is the main cause for the changing colour of the natural resources. 

Fuchsine.jpgfuchsine

A’Marie and Mabi Swimwear were the selected brands for this editorial.

A’Marie uses natural and manmade materials and its manufactured in accordance with the highest European environmental standards. The  sustainable fabrics used in the clothes are Alcantara, Micromodal and Tencel.

fabrics.jpg

fabrics I
A’Marie Clothes

 

Mabi Swimwear is a sustainable brand made in Brazil and based in London.

This brand is part of the brazilian organization Green Initiative (Iniciativa Verde), which helps deforestation in Brazil.

Green Initiative and Friend of Forest (Amigo da Floresta) are projects with the aim of  contributing to the improvement of biodiversity, water and air quality by calculating the carbon emissions of companies and replanting trees in the Brazilian Forest.

swuimsuit
Swimsuit Mabi Swimwear

 

Eco-friendly and Ethical fashion should be the rule by 2017 and unfortunately there is still a lot to fight for, for the sake of the workers, animals, environment and for our health as well.

Numerous organisations and campaigns are doing their best to promote their core values, defending nature and advocating human rights.

I will be posting more fashion editorials with sustainable brands/designers, if however, you know any sustainable brands available in UK which I could collaborate with, please contact me.

Meanwhile enjoy some pictures of the shoot!

 

Photography Ieva Lasmane (@lasmaneieva)

Styling Green Taja (@taja_asiul)

Mua & Model QiuYi He (@qyeehe)

Brands: A’Marie & Mabi Swimwear ( Ethical and sustainable brands)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: